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Home Publications Vietnamese Publications A new book on ‘Vietnam and the East Sea’ published

A new book on ‘Vietnam and the East Sea’ published

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The new book entitled ‘Vietnam and the East Sea’ aims to help the domestic and international public better understand the real situation in the East Sea, around Hoang Sa (Paracel) and Truong Sa (Spratly) islands, as well as Vietnam’s views on solving related disputes.

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The 40-page book, published by the Vietnam Peace and Development Foundation, features the East Sea-related issues in a comprehensive way. It highlights Vietnam’s policies on settling disputes in the East Sea through peaceful means, and promoting the implementation of the Declaration on the Conduct of Parties in the East Sea (DOC), and the formulation of a Code of Conduct in the East Sea (COC).

The book also reflects Vietnam’s stance on the ‘U-shape’ line demand and the activities of Vietnamese fishermen in the Hoang Sa (Paracel) area.

In addition, the book updates the readers on the main contents of the guiding agreement on solving marine-related issues between Vietnam and China, which was signed on October 11, 2011. Accordingly, the two sides agreed to settle disputes at sea between the two countries in accordance with international laws, including the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), but separate them from multilateral disputes.

 

(Source: Official Website of the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment of Vietnam)


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